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Growing Amazing Heirloom Tomatoes

Posted by Shannon L. Buck on March 3, 2009


Any tomato lover would probably agree that there is nothing finer than a nice, ripe home-grown tomato in your mouth. There is no comparing the rich, sweet, oh-so-plump goodness that is the tomatoes you can grow on the vine at home with just a little bit of love and care to the rough and tough, bland and sometimes overly processed vegetable in the produce aisle at the local grocery store.

Growing Amazing Heirloom Tomatoes by Dave Truman

 Any tomato lover would probably agree that there is nothing finer than a nice, ripe home-grown tomato in your mouth. There is no comparing the rich, sweet, oh-so-plump goodness that is the tomatoes you can grow on the vine at home with just a little bit of love and care to the rough and tough, bland and sometimes overly processed vegetable in the produce aisle at the local grocery store.

Whether you like to enjoy your tomatoes straight off the vine or specially prepared with a dish in the kitchen, the different varieties of delicious heirloom tomatoes are worth waiting for. Sure, instant gratification is not a big thing when it comes to tomatoes. You go to the grocery store and bag up a couple of the reddest tomatoes in the produce aisle and bring them home only to find them still bland, or too soft.

Does this sound like a problem you have ever had with your grocery store tomatoes? Good, quality heirloom tomato plants in your garden could make this predicament a thing of the past.

Heirloom tomatoes are one of the most popular varieties of tomato out there. If you are looking to grow tomatoes of your own, check out one of the hundreds of varieties of heirloom tomatoes there are for you to choose from. Heirloom tomatoes are an older variety of tomatoes that come from a plant that was pollinated openly by hybrids fifty or more years go.  These tomatoes come in a real variety, from the small purplish-colored black cherry tomato to large red tomatoes.

It isnt hard to grow a delicious garden of heirloom tomatoes, but it does take some basic gardening skills to grow the perfect tomatoes. You have to buy the seed specially. Heirloom seeds are not hard to find but they are separate from the regular variety of tomato seeds that you can pick up casually at the register, so be aware of the difference.

Growing delicious heirloom tomatoes isnt hard”if you know what youre doing as far as gardening goes. Heirloom tomatoes are naturally delicious”especially to a tomato lover, and they are pretty hard to destroy in the gardening department. It is important to start off with the right seed, and that is the most control that you will really have over your heirloom tomatoes, outside of regular maintenance such as water and pruning/weeding care.

Other than that, growing heirloom tomatoes is not a difficult thing to do at all. With the proper water, sunlight, and a soil bed that is adequate in nutrients growing great tomatoes will be easy.

If you are a true tomato connoisseur, you know the difference between a produce aisle tomato and the real thing, and you can understand why the difference between the two of these makes a difference. Heirloom tomatoes are the highest in quality and taste, and there is nothing better than homegrown tomatoes. Combine the two for an ultimately pleasurable tomato-growing (not to mention tomato eating) experience!

 

Did you know your vegetable garden layout can make a big difference in how well your tomatoes grow? A little bit of planning will make a big difference. Learn more about planning your vegetable garden on the Vegetable Gardeners website.

Article Source: http://www.homesteadarticles.com

Article URL: http://www.homesteadarticles.com/Article/Growing-Amazing-Heirloom-Tomatoes/32199

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Zowie and I love tomatoes fresh from the garden. What is your favorite thing to grow?

Shannon

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2 Responses to “Growing Amazing Heirloom Tomatoes”

  1. Leasmom said

    I’ve got to save that article.

  2. I know. It’s right here for my future use. I hear that heirloom tomatoes are not what like we purchase in the stores. They are supposed to be far better tasting as well as healthier for you.

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